Seminar: Trends in Distributed Systems

Lecturer Prof. Dr. Christian Becker
Coordinator M.Sc. Dominik Schäfer
Type Seminar (SM 453 for Bachelor & IS 722 for Master students)
ECTS SM 453: 4/5 ECTS (depending on "Prüfungsordnung" [Examination Regulations])
IS 722: 6 ECTS for all. According to the current version of the "Prüfungsordnung" (Examination Regulations), M.Sc. Business Informatics gain 4 ECTS for the seminar and 2 ECTS for the key qualification "Scientific Research". If the old version of the "Prüfungsordnung" (Examination Regulations) applies for your studies, you will get an appropriate amount of ECTS.
ID-Number SM 453 (Bachelor seminar; former: SM 441)
IS 722 (Master seminar)
Prerequisites basic knowledge in information technology
Course Language English
Form of Assessment Conference style seminar (see details below)
Application process Mandatory registration for this class is by e-mail: dominik.schaefer@uni-mannheim.de. Please include (1) name, (2) matriculation number, (3) course of study (Bachelor or Master!), and (4) transcript of records. Further the registration should include a list of three preferred topics (in ordered priority). Without this prioritization the topics will randomly assigned. Topics will be assigned to students before the kick-off. Deregistrations are only accepted until February 8th, 2018. Application Deadline: February 2nd, 2018. Incomplete registrations will be ignored!
Applicable for SM 453/441 (former): B.Sc. Business Informatics
IS 722: M.Sc. Management, M.Sc. Business Education, M.Sc. Business Informatics, Diploma Business Administration, Diploma Business Education
Acceptance notification February 6th, 2018
Kick-off session February 12th, 2018 at 10:15 am - 11:45 am, L 15, 1-6 Room 714-715
Deadlines Seminar paper: April 23rd, 2018 at 12 noon
Reviews: May 7th, 2018, 12 noon
Camera ready paper: May 14th, 2018, 12 noon
Final Presentation May 18th, 2018 at L15, 1-6 Room 714-715

Conference style seminar

This seminar is organized in a scientific conference style. All applicants are notified until Februar, 6th, 2018 whether they are accepted. All accepted participants must write a scientific paper about the assigned topics and submit those papers until the deadline (April, 23, 12 noon). After that, the paper review phase starts and each paper will be assigned to at least two other participants who have to review the papers of two or three other authors. The review phase ends on May, 7, 12 noon, and the reviews must be submitted to the authors and the supervisors. After that, the authors have time to improve their papers based on the feedback from the reviews. The camera ready version (final  version) of the paper is due on the May, 14, 12 noon. The "conference" (final presentations) takes place on May 18

The grading is divided into different parts: The first part is the camera ready version of the seminar paper. This is the most important part and it is weighted with 50% of the overall grade. Second, the reviews for the other authors  are weighted with 20%. It is crucial to look at the work of others with a critical eye and to give constructive feedback. The last grading criterion is the presentation at the "conference" and the participation during the discussions (30%). 

If the assigned topic contains an implementation part the students don't need to participate in the review phase. For these topics the grading is divided into 70% for the implementation and 30% for the presentation and participation during the discussion.

Students have to pass each part separately. Attendance at the kick-off session and the final presentation session is mandatory.

For all papers the IEEE manuscript template must be used. Here, we offer a customized version of the Initiates file downloadtemplate (page numbering is already included).

Seminar topics

In this semester's seminar (FSS 2018), we offer the following topics.

 

An Analysis of Interactions between Platoons and Conventional Traffic

Supervisor: Christian Krupitzer

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) enables vehicles to drive autonomously. Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) complements ACC by communication capabilities for cooperation. This enables cooperative driving activities, such as platooning. Platooning is a method of grouping vehicles for increasing the capacity of roads. An automated highway system is a proposed technology for doing this.

The objective of this seminar work is to describe different situations for interactions between platoons and normal traffic. Further, the seminar work should present and compare existing approaches for handling these situations.

 

A Taxonomy of Optimization Factors for Platooning

Supervisor: Christian Krupitzer

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) enables vehicles to drive autonomously. Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) complements ACC by communication capabilities for cooperation. This enables cooperative driving activities, such as platooning. Platooning is a method of grouping vehicles for increasing the capacity of roads. An automated highway system is a proposed technology for doing this.

The objective of this seminar work is to present and compare different factors for which the assignment of platoons might be optimized. Additionally, metrics for these factors should be defined.

 

A Comparison of IT Systems for Sport Analytics

Supervisor: Jens Naber

Information Technology (IT) is omnipresent in today’s world. With the development to very small and lightweight devices, it is possible to use them for analysis of the performance of athletes. Combined with high performance computing such as Cloud Computing resources or in-memory databases, it is possible to analyze the performance of athletes in real-time for adjustments in the training session or games.

The objective of this seminar is to present and compare existing systems for analysis of the performance of soccer players. The focus is on which systems use which data and which type of analysis is possible in real-time, post-game analysis, or pre-training planning / post-training analysis.

 

An Analysis of Big data in Sports Analytics

Supervisor: Jens Naber

Information Technology (IT) is omnipresent in today’s world. With the development to very small and lightweight devices, it is possible to use them for analysis of the performance of athletes. Combined with high performance computing such as Cloud Computing resources or in-memory databases, it is possible to use Big Data / Data Mining procedures to tackle the amount of data and gain important insights and relations.

The objective of this seminar is to present and compare existing systems for analysis of the performance of athletes that integrate procedures of the Data Mining research domain. The focus is on which systems use which data and which type of analysis is possible in real-time, post-game analysis, scouting, or pre-training planning / post-training analysis.

 

Interoperability for IoT-Platforms

Supervisor: Felix Maximilian Roth

 

In the Internet-of-Things, devices are enabled to cooperate through middleware platforms. Those, however, cannot interact across platforms due to several heterogeneities, such as, e.g., different interaction paradigms. Some approaches have been presented to enable interoperability between platforms.

 

The goal of this seminar thesis is to find, review and evaluate such approaches with respect to certain criteria.

 

 

High-Available Distributed Knowledge for Self-Adaptive Systems

Supervisor: Martin Pfannemüller

Self-adaptive Systems modify their behavior at run-time to maintain their performance after changes in the system resources or the environment. This is called adaptation. Therefore, an adaptation logic (AL) monitors the system resources and the environment, analyzes the monitored results, develops change plans, and executes them. A knowledge component is used to store relevant information regarding the adaptation process. Depending on the AL approach the presence of distributed knowledge can be crucial for the functionality of the AL.

In literature, mainly the distribution of the AL components has been investigated. The objective of this seminar work is to present and compare different approaches for the distribution of the knowledge component which is able to tolerate leaving or failing participants in the system.

 

Use Cases for MAPE Distribution Patterns

Supervisor: Martin Pfannemüller

Self-adaptive Systems modify their behavior at run-time to maintain their performance after changes in the system resources or the environment. This is called adaptation. Therefore, an adaptation logic (AL) monitors the system resources and the environment, analyzes the monitored results, develops change plans, and executes them. ALs typically follow the MAPE-K architecture. Multiple distribution patterns for this architecture exist.

The goal of this seminar work is to identify possible real-world use cases or scenarios where the (re-) distribution of MAPE components at runtime analogously to existing distribution patterns could be beneficial for the whole system.

 

Survey on Edge Computing Approaches

Supervisor: Dominik Schäfer 

Cloud computing augments the computational abilities of modern computing environments with centralized resources. Edge computing pursues similar goals, but uses decentralized resources. These resources are located at the edge of the internet and can be reached with short delays. 

The goal of this seminar is to categorize existing edge computing approaches and to conduct a comparison.

 

Task Partitioning Approaches in Distributed Computing Systems

Supervisor: Dominik Schäfer 

In distributed computing systems task partitioning is used to split up big workloads into smaller parts. This can lead to a high parallelization degree and improve the resource utilization. Especially in mobile cloud computing approaches, task partitioning can benefit the execution quality of applications. 

The goal of this seminar is to categorize existing task partitioning approaches and to conduct a comparison.

 

Identification of Access Barriers to Technology

Supervisor: Janick Edinger

Technological advances have made our lives more comfortable than ever before. Mobile devices, ubiquitous fast Internet access, and wearable sensor devices have changed the way we live, work, and communicate. These technologies do not only supplement existing areas of human life but also create new fields of entertainment, work, and social interaction. However, it is easy to forget that many people are excluded from these technologies for multiple reasons, including disabilities, diseases, or age-related limitations.

The objective of this seminar work is to identify different access barriers to technology and categorize them. It should be discussed why these barriers exist and how they can be tackled.

 

Applications for Edge and Fog Computing in the Internet of Things

Supervisor: Janick Edinger

Fog and edge computing are two emerging computing paradigms that supplement the idea of processing every single task in the cloud. Instead of using centralized cloud resources, fog and edge computing make use of nearby end-user devices and compute tasks on multiple less powerful resources in close proximity. This is particularly useful for applications of the Internet of Things (IoT) as these applications often use large data streams.

As fog and edge computing currently are rather new and hot topics in the field of distributed computing, the first goal of this seminar thesis is to define both terms. The second goal is to identify applications in the area of IoT that would benefit from fog and edge computing.

 

 

 

 

Implementation Topics

 

 

 

 

Implementation: Face Detection on Mobile Devices

Supervisor: Anton Wachner

Today, manual input still is the predominant way to interact with a mobile device. Unobtrusive eye-based human-computer interfaces are an emerging trend in human-computer interaction and accurate pupil detection is one of the key challenges. Reliable pupil localization can be achieved through including face detection and extraction of eye regions as preprocessing steps. While facial feature extraction algorithms run very fast, the face detection step is a bottleneck in the pupil detection pipeline.

The objective of this seminar work is to identify face detection algorithms and to select one of them for implementation in Java or C/C++. The algorithm should be implemented and evaluated in a given framework as part of this seminar thesis.

 

 

 

Implementation of a Context Management Module for Adaptive Authentication

Supervisor: Patricia Arias Cabarcos

Adaptive authentication systems are able to dynamically select the best mechanism for authenticating a user depending on contextual factors, such as location, proximity to devices, and other attributes.

The objective of this seminar work is to analyze and test contextual factors that have an impact on the security and usability levels of authenticators. The student will implement a set of generic components for context extraction and management in Android OS, integrating them within an adaptive authentication architecture.