Seminar: Trends in Distributed Systems

Lecturer Prof. Dr. Christian Becker
Coordinator M.Sc. Dominik Schäfer
Type Seminar (SM 453 for Bachelor & IS 722 for Master students)
ECTS SM 453: 4/5 ECTS (depending on "Prüfungsordnung" [Examination Regulations])
IS 722: 6 ECTS for all. According to the current version of the "Prüfungsordnung" (Examination Regulations), M.Sc. Business Informatics gain 4 ECTS for the seminar and 2 ECTS for the key qualification "Scientific Research". If the old version of the "Prüfungsordnung" (Examination Regulations) applies for your studies, you will get an appropriate amount of ECTS.
ID-Number SM 453 (Bachelor seminar; former: SM 441)
IS 722 (Master seminar)
Prerequisites basic knowledge in information technology
Course Language English
Form of Assessment Conference style seminar (see details below)
Application process Mandatory registration for this class is by e-mail: dominik.schaefer@uni-mannheim.de. Please include (1) name, (2) matriculation number, (3) course of study (Bachelor or Master!), and (4) transcript of records. Further the registration should include a list of three preferred topics (in ordered priority). Without this prioritization the topics will randomly assigned. Topics will be assigned to students before the kick-off. Deregistrations are only accepted until February, 9, 11:59 pm. Application Deadline: February, 6, 2017. Incomplete registrations will be ignored!
Applicable for SM 453/441 (former): B.Sc. Business Informatics
IS 722: M.Sc. Management, M.Sc. Business Education, M.Sc. Business Informatics, Diploma Business Administration, Diploma Business Education
Acceptance notification February, 8, 2017, 12 noon
Kick-off session February, 13, 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm, L 15, 1-6 Room 714-715
Deadlines Seminar paper: April, 24, 12 noon
Reviews: May, 8, 12 noon
Camera ready paper: May, 15, 12 noon
Final Presentation May, 19, 2017, 8.30 am - 3.30 pm, L15, 1-6 Room 714-715

Conference style seminar

This seminar is organized in a scientific conference style. All applicants are notified until February, 8, 2017 whether they are accepted. All accepted participants must write a scientific paper about the assigned topics and submit those papers until the deadline (April, 24, 12 noon). After that, the paper review phase starts and each paper will be assigned to at least two other participants who have to review the papers of two or three other authors. The review phase ends on May, 8, 12 noon, and the reviews must be submitted to the authors and the supervisors. After that, the authors have time to improve their papers based on the feedback from the reviews. The camera ready version (final  version) of the paper is due on the May, 15, 12 noon. The "conference" (final presentations) takes place on the May, 19

The grading is divided into different parts: The first part is the camera ready version of the seminar paper. This is the most important part and it is weighted with 50% of the overall grade. Second, the reviews for the other authors  are weighted with 20%. It is crucial to look at the work of others with a critical eye and to give constructive feedback. The last grading criterion is the presentation at the "conference" and the participation during the discussions (30%). Students have to pass each part separately. Attendance at the kick-off session and the final presentation session is mandatory.

For all papers the IEEE manuscript template must be used. Here, we offer a customized version of the Initiates file downloadtemplate (page numbering is already included).

Seminar topics

In this semester's seminar (FSS 2017), we offer the following topics.

 

Handling of Exceptional Situations in Platooning

Supervisor: Martin Pfannemüller (responsibility changed!)

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) enables vehicles to drive autonomously. Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) complements ACC by communication capabilities for cooperation. This enables cooperative driving activities, such as platooning. Platooning is a method of grouping vehicles for increasing the capacity of roads. An automated highway system is a proposed technology for doing this.

The objective of this seminar work is to present and compare existing approaches for handling of exceptional situations in Platooning. These situations include the loss of communication or non-controllable vehicles that drive between gaps in platoons.

 

Business Models for Infrastructure-aided Platooning

Supervisor: Christian Krupitzer

Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) enables vehicles to drive autonomously. Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control (CACC) complements ACC by communication capabilities for cooperation. This enables cooperative driving activities, such as platooning. Platooning is a method of grouping vehicles for increasing the capacity of roads. An automated highway system is a proposed technology for doing this.

The objective of this seminar work is to present and compare different business models and analyze which of them might be feasible for platooning. On the one hand, the perspective of providers (companies or government) of the infrastructure needs to be taken into account. On the other hand, the perspective of individual drivers and logistic companies are relevant, as they have to be willing to pay. Hence, a business model should include both aspects.

 

Methods and Standards for Charging of Electric Vehicles

Supervisor: Benedikt Kirpes

In the future, electric vehicles (EVs) are intended to supersede traditional combustion-engine vehicles. In combination with the enhancing intake of renewable energies and smooth integration with Smart Cities, EVs can significantly contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, various issues hinder the broad adoption of EVs by private and commercial entities. One central aspect are battery life and battery state of health (SoH) which largely affect the costs of EVs. Different factors affect the battery SoH, including the charging. Charging can be distinguished regarding charging method (inductive, conductive), technical infrastructure (standards, type of connectors, AC, DC) or charging speed (measured in kW).

The goal of this seminar work is to identify methods and standards for EV charging and to review literature regarding the influence of charging and other factors on the battery SoH.

 

A Comparison of Power Grid Simulation Systems

Supervisor: Sonja Klingert

In the last years, the power grid has been undergoing a fundamental change: From an originally mostly centralized grid, it has been evolving into heterogeneous grid with a plethora of distributed generation resources and bi-directional energy flows. With the advent of so-called “prosumers” also the differentiation between power generation and demand gets blurred.

In order to better assess how to deal with the dynamics of the power grid, numerous simulation models have been created for various different use cases. In this seminar work, an overview about existing models shall be given focusing on the flexibility of power demand components. A selection of 2-3 specific smart grid simulation tools shall be presented and evaluated for one common use case. 

 

Visual Scripting for Pervasive Middlewares

Supervisor: Jens Naber

While Pervasive Systems grow larger and contain more and more heterogeneous devices and services we need to configure them to solve their tasks in an efficient manner. To achieve this the middleware often has to be configured in advanced or even be tailored to the given scenario. The goal is to give the user the possibility to configure the middleware via visual scripting.

The objective of this seminar work is to identify visual scripting solutions and methods and compare their feature sets and approaches regarding the usability for Pervasive Middlewares.

 

Collaborative Learning Platforms in Lecture Rooms

Supervisor: Jens Naber

Learning can be more effective in groups. The learning effect can be increased by discussing and explaining the topics in a group, even when all the participants are on the same knowledge level. The positive effect can be easier achieved by incorporating technology in the group work. This lead to the development of Collaborative Learning Platforms.

The goal of this seminar topic is to identify and analyze different Collaborative Learning Platforms, which can or could be used in a lecture room context.

 

A Systematic Literature Review on Smart Health Scenarios for Pervasive Systems

Supervisor: Max Roth

Pervasive systems consist of numerous connected and always available computing devices weaved into our everyday's life, such as smart health or smart home systems. They are able to automatically adapt to the context by changing system parameters or altering the context, e.g., turn lights on when somebody enters the room.

The goal of this seminar paper is to give an overview on smart health scenarios for pervasive systems by conducting a systematic literature review.

 

A Systematic Literature Review on Smart Home Scenarios for Pervasive Systems

Supervisor: Max Roth

Pervasive systems consist of numerous connected and always available computing devices weaved into our everyday's life, such as smart health or smart home systems. They are able to automatically adapt to the context by changing system parameters or altering the context, e.g., turn lights on when somebody enters the room.

The goal of this seminar paper is to give an overview on smart home scenarios for pervasive systems by conducting a systematic literature review.

 

Survey on Mobile Agents

Supervisor: Janick Edinger

Mobile agents are programs that are able to autonomously migrate from one device to another to be executed on the destination computer. While the topic has been discussed a lot in past research the trend of distributed computing and code offloading makes mobile agents a relevant research topic again as they share many similarities with current research projects.

The goal of this thesis is to discuss the characteristics of mobile agents and compare them with state-of-the-art distributed computing systems.

 

Hole Punching

Supervisor: Janick Edinger

In peer-to-peer networks, direct connections between two devices are often blocked by firewalls or disabled through network address translation (NAT). In real world applications this limitations has to be overcome to allow the direct interaction between two parties. Hole punching is one way to  enable such a direct communication. 

The goal of this thesis is to identify different kinds of hole punching, discuss their applicability, and implement a minimal solution for the different types.

 

Data management in Distributed Computing

Supervisor: Dominik Schäfer

In distributed computing environments, data plays an important role. Some applications only need a small amount of data, which can be attached to a task. Other applications (e.g., for video processing or data analytics) need large data sets. Managing those sets includes for example the placement, migration, and duplicate elimination. There are different strategies, how to place data and the corresponding task.

The objective of this seminar work is to present and compare existing data management approaches for distributed computing. Additionally, the goal is to introduce a theoretical design for data management in the Tasklet system.

 

Automatic Parallelization in Distributed Computing

Supervisor: Dominik Schäfer

In distributed computing, tasks can be split up, to make use of a multitude of remote resources for a faster execution of computing problems. This can be done (semi-) automatic. Approaches in the area of grid computing, cluster computing, and high performance computing make use of these kind of mechanisms.

The goal of this seminar is to identify approaches for automatic and semi-automatic parallelization in distributed computing. Therefore, an analysis of the state of the art systems in the mentioned area is the focus of this seminar topic.

 

Artificial Intelligence for Social Welfare

Supervisor: Vaskar Raychoudhury

There has been a dramatic increase in interest in Artificial Intelligence (AI) in recent years. AI has been successfully applied to societal challenge problems and it has a great potential to provide tremendous social good in the future. It can be applied to developing smart cities, crowd sensing, intelligent transportation, elderly healthcare, environmental sustainability, and public welfare (like crime profiling of a city). A student / group needs to choose one or more areas and then gather related literature and research attempts and then produce an in depth literature survey resulting into a term paper.

 

Smart and connected health: An emerging Internet of Things (IoT) domain

Supervisor: Vaskar Raychoudhury

Given the aging of society, elderly healthcare has become a major IoT application where researchers have developed IoT-based round-the-clock remote health monitoring systems for elderly and ailing individuals (using BP, pulse sensors) and to inform caregivers in case of an emergency. The Smart and Connected Health idea is to accelerate the development and use of innovative approaches that would support the much needed transformation of healthcare from reactive and hospital-centered to preventive, proactive, evidence-based, person-centered and focused on well-being rather than disease. A student / group needs to gather related literature and research attempts and then produce an in depth literature survey resulting into a term paper. Also, they need to propose some new innovative ideas towards this direction.

 

Continuous Adaptive Authentication

Supervisor: Patricia Arias

Digital identity management technology demands constant user interaction to perform authentication and to input identification data; procedures that are repetitive, prone to error and interrupt the primary task of actually using and enjoying the services. Emerging research trends to tackle this problem are “Adaptive Authentication” and “Continuous Authentication”.

The aim of this work is to review the literature on the field, compare approaches, and critically analyze them.

 

Security in Personal Data Ecosystems

Supervisor: Patricia Arias

With the constant use of digital services, social media, wearable trackers, smartphones and the like, a huge amount of personal information is being generated, inferred, collected and used with different purposes. However most of this information is currently collected by third parties, and shared for their own benefit (e.g., target advertising) without considering the user as the center.

The aim of this work is to review the literature on secure personal data collection and sharing under the perspective of self-management (user control and privacy).