Seminar: Trends in Distributed Systems

Lecturer Prof. Dr. Christian Becker
Coordinator M.Sc. Felix Maximilian Roth
Type Seminar (SM 453 for Bachelor & IS 722 for Master students)
ECTS SM 453: 4/5 ECTS (depending on "Prüfungsordnung" [Examination Regulations])
IS 722: 6 ECTS for all. According to the current version of the "Prüfungsordnung" (Examination Regulations), M.Sc. Business Informatics gain 4 ECTS for the seminar and 2 ECTS for the key qualification "Scientific Research". If the old version of the "Prüfungsordnung" (Examination Regulations) applies for your studies, you will get an appropriate amount of ECTS.
ID-Number SM 453 (Bachelor seminar; former: SM 441)
IS 722 (Master seminar)
Prerequisites basic knowledge in information technology
Course Language English
Form of Assessment Conference style seminar (see details below)
Application process Mandatory registration for this class is by e-mail: felix.maximilian.roth@uni-mannheim.de. Please include (1) name, (2) matriculation number, (3) course of study (Bachelor or Master!), and (4) transcript of records. Further the registration should include a list of three preferred topics (in ordered priority). Without this prioritization the topics will randomly assigned. Topics will be assigned to students before the kick-off. Deregistrations are only accepted until September, 1. Application Deadline: August, 28. Incomplete registrations will be ignored!
Applicable for SM 453/441 (former): B.Sc. Business Informatics
IS 722: M.Sc. Management, M.Sc. Business Education, M.Sc. Business Informatics, Diploma Business Administration, Diploma Business Education
Acceptance notification August 30, 2017
Kick-off session September 4 at 1:45 pm - 3:15 pm, L 15, 1-6 Room 714-715
Deadlines Seminar paper: November 6 at 12 noon
Reviews: November, 20, 12 noon
Camera ready paper: November, 27, 12 noon
Final Presentation November 30 at L15, 1-6 Room 714-715
December 1 at L15, 1-6 Room 714-715

Conference style seminar

This seminar is organized in a scientific conference style. All applicants are notified until August, 30th, 2017 whether they are accepted. All accepted participants must write a scientific paper about the assigned topics and submit those papers until the deadline (November, 6, 12 noon). After that, the paper review phase starts and each paper will be assigned to at least two other participants who have to review the papers of two or three other authors. The review phase ends on November, 20, 12 noon, and the reviews must be submitted to the authors and the supervisors. After that, the authors have time to improve their papers based on the feedback from the reviews. The camera ready version (final  version) of the paper is due on the November, 27, 12 noon. The "conference" (final presentations) takes place on November 30 and December, 01

The grading is divided into different parts: The first part is the camera ready version of the seminar paper. This is the most important part and it is weighted with 50% of the overall grade. Second, the reviews for the other authors  are weighted with 20%. It is crucial to look at the work of others with a critical eye and to give constructive feedback. The last grading criterion is the presentation at the "conference" and the participation during the discussions (30%). 

If the assigned topic contains an implementation part the students don't need to participate in the review phase. For these topics the grading is divided into 70% for the implementation and 30% for the presentation and participation during the discussion.

Students have to pass each part separately. Attendance at the kick-off session and the final presentation session is mandatory.

For all papers the IEEE manuscript template must be used. Here, we offer a customized version of the Initiates file downloadtemplate (page numbering is already included).

Seminar topics

In this semester's seminar (HWS 2017), we offer the following topics.

Gaze-based control of mobile devices

1. Categorization of Input Methods for Mobile Devices

 

Supervisor: Anton Wachner

We live in a mobile world in which manual input still is the predominant way to interact with a mobile device. However, over the past years, alternative input methods have been implemented that use voice recognition, hand gestures, or external devices. Examples are Google Assistant and Lenovo Motion Control.

The objective of this seminar work is to identify and categorize alternative input methods for mobile devices based on a thorough literature review.

2. Challenges of Eye-tracking in Mobile Scenarios

 

Supervisor: Anton Wachner

Eye-tracking is a popular mechanism in human-computer interaction to identify the position of the user’s pupils. Based on these results, the gaze position can be estimated and used as an input method for computational devices. Experiments performed in closed environments with a static setup show good results and can estimate the gaze position precisely. However, eye tracking on mobile devices faces further challenges due to the nature of the mobile devices and changes in the environment.

The objective of this seminar work is to identify and discuss challenges of mobile eye tracking based on a through literature review.

3. ***Implementation*** Pupil Detection on Mobile Devices

Supervisor: Anton Wachner & Janick Edinger

Today, manual input still is the predominant way to interact with a mobile device. Unobtrusive eye-based human-computer interfaces are an emerging trend in human-computer interaction. One fundamental step to perform eye-tracking on mobile devices is to detect the user’s pupils at runtime. In the literature, there are many approaches for pupil detection that can be adapted for mobile settings.

The goal of this seminar work is to identify pupil detection algorithms and to select one of them for implementation in C/C++. The algorithm should be implemented and evaluated in a given framework as part of this seminar thesis.

Note: This seminar topic includes implementation and its structure differs from the other topics. Please be aware that implementation in C/C++ will be an important part of this seminar work.

 

Lightweight distributed computing

4. Opportunities and Incentives in Social Distributed Computing

Supervisor: Janick Edinger

Cloud and grid computing are possibilities to use computational devices more efficiently and to augment the range of  available processing power for computation intensive tasks. Desktop grid systems enable sharing of devices even among private device owners. But why would anybody offer computational resources to anybody else? The answer could be either social relationships or other incentives such as financial payment or non-financial rewards.

The objective of this seminar work is to discuss how social relations can be used in distributed computing and what incentives people have to share their computational resources with others.

5. Survey on Distributed Computing

Supervisor: Dominik Schäfer

Today, personal computers are very powerful but their computational power often remains unused. Distributed Computing can make use of these unused resources and accumulate excess capacities to an enormous source of computation. Existing approaches differ in several dimensions like, flexibility, infrastructure, security, etc.

The goal of this seminar is to analyse the existing literature and create a categorization of approaches in the field of distributed computing systems.

6. Task Migration Techniques Distributed Computing Systems

Supervisor: Dominik Schäfer

In edge device-based distributed computing systems, tasks can be migrated during their run-time to reduce delays, increase the fault-tolerance, or balance the workload. There are different mechanisms for task migration that support different goals.

The objective of this seminar is to give an overview over existing task migration mechanisms and to compare their behaviour and characteristics. 

 

Pervasive Computing

7. Survey on Pervasive Systems in the Smart Health Sector

Supervisor: Felix Maximilian Roth

Pervasive systems consist of numerous connected and always available computing devices weaved into our everyday's life, such as smart health or smart home systems. They are able to automatically adapt to the context by changing system parameters or altering the context, e.g., turn lights on when somebody enters the room.

The goal of this seminar paper is to give an overview on pervasive middleware platforms for the support in the smart health sector.

8. Survey on Context Integration in Interoperability Solutions for Pervasive Systems

Supervisor: Felix Maximilian Roth

Pervasive systems consist of numerous connected and always available computing devices weaved into our everyday's life, such as smart health or smart home systems. They are able to automatically adapt to the context by changing system parameters or altering the context, e.g., turn lights on when somebody enters the room.

The goal of this seminar paper is to give an overview of context integration in interoperability solutions for pervasive systems.

9. Survey on Pervasive Systems in modern Meeting Rooms

Supervisor: Jens Naber

Modern Meeting Rooms contain a high amount of technical devices, provided by the users or the room itself. To allow an efficient working environment these devices should be connected and work together to support the meeting. To achieve this goal a Pervasive Middleware can be used.

The goal of this seminar paper is to give an overview and categorization of Pervasive Middlewares for the support of meetings in a modern working environment.

10. Survey on Pervasive File Storage and Distribution

Supervisor: Jens Naber

Many modern places, like meeting or lecture rooms, provide a Pervasive System to interconnect the devices of different users. In many scenarios the users want to exchange not only small texts or trigger specific functions in the system, but they want to handle for instance larger media files. These files need to be distributed within the system and in some instances the system should store or cache files for later use.

The goal of this seminar paper is to give an overview of file storage and distribution systems tailored for Pervasive Systems.

 

Authentication

11. Programmability of User Authentication Mechanisms for Adaptive Systems

Supervisor: Patricia Arias Cabarcos

Adaptive authentication systems are able to dynamically select the best mechanism for authenticating a user depending on contextual factors, such as location, proximity to devices, and other attributes. For these systems to be flexible, scalable, and straightforward to deploy, it is important that a wide range of authenticators is supported (e.g., face-scan, eye recognition, voice recognition, fingerprint), and that those authenticators are easy to discover, switch, read and adjust in a standardized way without requiring complex changes in the adaptation logic.

The objective of this seminar work is to explore abstractions for programmable authentication, compare them discussing their suitability for Adaptive Authentication, and, if necessary, define and/or implement a new abstraction grounded on this knowledge. 

12. Context Modelling for Adaptive Authentication

Supervisor: Patricia Arias Cabarcos

Adaptive authentication systems are able to dynamically select the best mechanism for authenticating a user depending on contextual factors, such as location, proximity to devices, and other attributes. For the adaptation logic to use and reason about context information, proper context models need to be defined applicable to the authentication domain.

The objective of this seminar work is to survey context factors in the literature that impact the security and usability of authentication mechanisms, and build a context model to reason about these factors. Additionally, a basic architecture for using the context model, including representation format and context data access, is to be defined. 

 

E-Mobility

13. Comparison of payment methods for electric vehicle charging

Supervisor: Benedikt Kirpes

In the future, electric vehicles (EVs) are intended to supersede traditional combustion-engine vehicles. In combination with the enhancing intake of renewable energies and smooth integration with Smart Cities, EVs can significantly contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, various issues hinder the broad adoption of EVs by private and commercial entities. One central aspect is the insufficient charging infrastructure and missing standardization of payment methods.

The goal of this seminar work is to provide an overview about existing payment methods and their implementation and to compare the approaches considering different parameters.

 

Self-adaptive Systems

14. Overview and Comparison of Adaptive Communication Middlewares

Supervisor: Martin Pfannemüller

Communication middleware hides the complexity of communicating between heterogeneous systems. By that it helps developers to build software on top of it without thinking about protocols and platform specific properties. Additionally, an adaptive communication middleware should be able to run while the execution environment of it changes constantly.

The objective of this seminar work is to present an overview of the state of the art adaptive communication middleware approaches and their respective architectures. Additionally, the approaches should be briefly compared according to some self-developed criteria.

15. Specification and Templating of MAPE Control Loops

Supervisor: Martin Pfannemüller

Self-adaptive Systems (SAS) are an emerging trend in software engineering. These systems modify their behavior at run-time to maintain their performance after changes in the system resources or the environment. Typically, SAS are driven by feedback loops such as the well-known MAPE (Monitoring, Analyzing, Planning, Executing) loop.

The objective of this seminar work is to find and analyze possibilities for specifying MAPE control loops using models at system design time.

16. A Systematic Literature Review on Meta-Adaptation Strategies

Supervisor: Christian Krupitzer

Self-adaptive Systems (SAS) are an emerging trend in software engineering. These systems modify their behavior at run-time to maintain their performance after changes in the system resources or the environment. This is called adaptation. Therefore, an adaptation logic monitors the system resources and the environment, analyzes the monitored results, develop change plans, and execute changes based on knowledge in the form of rules, models, goals, or utility. However, due to uncertainty at runtime, this knowledge might be outdated or incomplete at runtime. Meta-adaptation might overcome this issue with adaptation of the adaptation logic’s (knowledge).

The objective of this seminar paper is to present an overview on strategies for meta-adaptation of the adaptation logic and, further, to classify them.